Tag Archives: reading

Don’t be Ashamed.

Read what you want to read. Don’t be afraid to ask about erotic novels, mental health, LGBT books, etc. The public library is for everyone. If you really don’t want to ask me, or my co-workers you can look them up on our online catalog.

For this reason libraries all our the world celebrate “Banned Book Week” which is an annual awareness campaign that celebrates the freedom to read, draws attention to banned and challenged books, and highlights persecuted individuals. Its goal is “to teach the importance of our First Amendment rights and the power of literature, and to draw attention to the danger that exists when restraints are imposed on the availability of information in a free society” (See the ALA).

Libraries and librarians attempt to ensure the availability of those unorthodox or unpopular viewpoints to all who wish to read them. We strive to keep material publicly available so that people can develop their own conclusions and opinions. So don’t judge and don’t be ashamed. Read what you want. 

Are you Reading this Summer?

When I think about summer I think of going to the beach, enjoying the outdoors, vacations, pools and delicious food at BBQs. My summer was spent going to the beach, boating and going on a few mini vacations which included Boston and upstate New York. I have a few “firsts” that happened to me. First time on a sailboat, first time whale watching and the first time in a cavern. It was also the first time I didn’t bring a book to read other than travel guides!

Others, however have been busy catching up on assigned summer reading. This year’s theme seems to be classic literature as many people have been asking for To Kill a Mockingbird, Great Expectations and The Grapes of Wrath to name a few. Summer reading is a rite of passage, and believe it or not some of these classics are actually good! Great Expectations by Charles Dickens has the most memorable characters in literature and if you have not read it I suggest you start there. You can also check out this list.

What time of the year do you read most? For me when the temperatures start to drop I’m sure I will pick up a few books along the way. Nevertheless, if you follow me on GoodReads a book or two will appear on my list even in the summer months.

Long Island Fiction

I recently did a Long Island Fiction book display. The books seemed to be pretty popular, because I had to refill the display a few times. One of the authors that I featured on this display is none other than Nelson Demille. For those of you who haven’t read any of his works I would suggest the John Corey series.

The first book in this series which I have read is called Plum Island. In this book you meet a very charismatic protagonist. He’s a brilliant detective, but he is also funny and sarcastic. His inner monologues really makes the book a pleasure to read, even though you are reading about a vicious double murder. Another thing Demille does very well is describe the sights and sounds of Long Island.

A series sounds like a lot of commitment, but don’t worry book two The Lion’s Game is just as good as the first if not better. In an interview Demille stated that he never intended on making Plum Island a series so the The Lion’s Game has the same sarcastic main character, but without a prolonged continuous plot line. In other words you can pick up any book in the series and not miss out. In this second book Corey is on the hunt for an international terrorist. Although this was published before the events of 9/11 the story line is eerily similar to the political situation we have now. Demille explains in his introduction that the similarity is due to all of the research and interviews he conducted with law enforcement in preparation of writing the book.

If you’ve flown from Long Island MacArthur airport or have been to the Cradle of Aviation Museum you’ll be delighted to find out how Demille sneaks these Long Island places into his book.

A Week of Light Reading

Our library was closed for several days for asbestos abatement. Now that everything is back to normal I’d like to share with you what I’ve read!

JacketBride of New France by Suzanne Desrochers

Recommended for lovers of historical fiction, this book follows the life of Laure Beasejour, a young, French orphan who is transported to the Canadian colony as part of a program sponsored by King Louis XIV that sent eight hundred young women abroad to marry settlers.

Jacket (1)Off the Record (Record Book 1) by K.A. Linde

Liz Dougherty’s a college newspaper reporter finds herself covering a state senator’s impromptu press conference. Although his politics rubs Liz the wrong way, their relationship turns into a secret, high-stakes romance that could destroy the careers they each hold dear. Recommended for fans of erotic novels, new adult books and contemporary romance.

dfgOn the Record (Record Book 2) by K.A. Linde

For Liz Dougherty, election day is a day of looking toward the future and saying goodbye to the past. But feelings for her former flame still linger. Find out how the romance drama ensues in the second book in the series.

Star Wars Reads Day/October 11

Join Star Wars fans around the world and discover some of the great books that explore the Star Wars universe!  The Lindenhurst Memorial Library will have two book displays highlighting Star Wars titles available from October 6–14.  The display in the Reference area will feature books from the science fiction collection expanding on the adventures of the characters you know and love, and introducing new ones.

The display outside the children’s room will feature books written for young readers.  They include fiction, movie books full of pictures from the films, graphic novels, and easy readers.

Read More, You Must!

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Where are all of the funny books?

With the passing of Joan Rivers, we have had a few people inquire about some of her books. Comedic books that are not necessarily biographies tend to fall into the “black hole” of browsing.. the 800s. The 800s according to Mr. Dewey is set aside for literature. So unless you are an english major or a big fan of poetry the 800s might not be your usual browsing area. However, if you venture to the 814s-817s you will find books under the subject heading of “american wit and humor”. Joan Rivers, Bill Maher, Penn Jillette, and other authors sometimes have their books shelved in this area. If you would like to reminisce check out some of these books by Ms. Rivers:

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New Ways to Find Your Next Read

My favorite way to find a new book to read is to browse the shelf. I usually like to read non-fiction books anything from self-help, health, true crime to history. My favorite and one of the most popular places people go to first in the library is the New Book area. Did you know our library website has a list of the new items? You can access this list anytime you want from home especially when it’s getting late and you can’t fall asleep. Most of the time these new items are checked out, but this is a great way to start building up your hold list! Sometimes I go through them and put all the new movies on hold. I love to check out some movies from our collection and have a movie night at home.

I’m sure many of you get recommendations for books from friends and family. Other ways are book reviews, advertisements, and of course your local librarian. In this digital age there are many great book review sites, book blogs, and other ways to find your next read. The library provides a digital service called, “NextReads”. If you signup for NextReads you will receive monthly emails of book suggestions. Most of the suggestions are the hot new books in the genre you signed up for. The librarians at LML always order these books for our collection.

A great website that I recommend is Goodreads. Goodreads is the Facebook for avid readers. Here you can compile a list of books that you have read or want to read, rate and review them. Goodreads will generate a list of recommendations based on what you have read, but also of what they are being paid to advertise. If you add friends you can see what they have read. Another great feature are the book lists. The people on Goodreads have compiled their own lists of books for genres, and sometimes vote on lists like “Beach Reads”. My to-read list grows day by day especially when I am friends with fellow librarians. Goodreads also helps you see a pattern in your reading. Tagging allows you to categorize the books you’ve added. Personally, it seems that my most popular tags are young adult fiction, romance and children’s literature. If you would like a Goodreads friend, add me!

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